Window Treatments in Belmont NH

Industry-Leading Hunter Douglas Window Treatments And Local Authorized Dealer Rod Ladman Window Designs Can Turn Your Belmont, NH Home Into A Showplace!

drapes in belmont nhWe are a full service Hunter Douglas dealer that sells, installs and repairs these high quality window treatments, Not only in the greater Belmont, New Hampshire area, but anywhere in Belknap,Grafton, Carroll and Merrimack counties

We have partnered with a skilled artisan and fabricator who creates beautiful custom-made soft furnishings in her workroom. This gives our customers the unique ability to choose from either the standard catalog of Hunter Douglas products, or opt for unique, one of a kind treatments that are created from your vision.

We’re in the window treatment business for over 40 years, but still love to meet new clients. We40 years in the windows industry would like to come out to your xxx NH home and discuss your window decor needs. Our consultation and measuring services are always completely free with absolutely no obligation

 

 

Please feel free to ask us about our:

    • Window Blinds
    • Vertical Blinds
    • Venetian Blinds
    • Wooden Blinds
    • Window Shades
    • Roller Shades
    • Custom-Made Drapery
    • Faux Wood Blinds
    • Pleated Shades
    • Roman Shades
    • Solar Shades
    • Room-Darkening Shades
    • Custom-Made Valances
    • Custom-Made Cornices
    • Cellular Shades
    • Woven Wood Shades
    • Plantation Shutters
    • Custom-Made Curtains
    • Custom-Made Sheers
    • Custom-Made Roman Shades
    • Drapery Hardware

What Is Your Window Style?

A window is tied to a room architecturally and visually through it’s style. The more common types of windows, such as double-hung and casement units, may act as plain backdrops for window dressings. But specialty windows are often associated with a particular architectural style. Compare a triangular window with a Palladian one. For instance, the geometric shape of a triangular window has a modern sensibility, whereas the classic Palladian style window is considered traditional.
When choosing window treatments, it is not enough to look only at the type and style of the window. You should examine how the window relates to the space around it-its visual weight. Is it a new fixed window in a room with a vintage fireplace and classical moldings? A window can sometimes go against all of the other decorative cues in the room. By assessing it’s style, you can cordinate the window with the spaces decor. Is it a horizontal picture window in a room with low ceilings? This is a problem of proportion. Understanding proportion- and other decorating basics such as scale, balance, line, harmony, and rhythm-will help you to choose a treatments that looks as good on the window as it does in the room. Let’s take a look at some of the information you’ll need to identify your window’s style

Window Types

To start, you should learn the basic types of windows and how they function, so as to better understand how your window treatments will integrate. A fixed window cannot be opened and is often used with an operable window. A double-hung window is the most common of the operable types; it has 2 sashes that move up and down, which means that only half of the window can be completely open at one time. A casement window is hinged vertically to swing in or out. A Jalousie window has horizontal slats or narrow strips of glass stripsdoor has top and bottom tracks that are opened louver-like by a crank. A sliding window ols door has top otom tracks on which the sash moves sideways.

You should also explore the various architectural styles of windows, which often influence your decor. A group of 3 windows with an arch over the center is the classical makeup of the the Palladian window. Some variations have 3 arches (one large, two small) or one fanlight-style arch over the 3 windows, This classical window tends to visually dominate a room, so it is logical as a focal point

A picture window is made up of one large fixed window flanked by two casement or double-hung units. As the name describes, a picture window is for framing dramatic views. Like a Palladian or picture window, a bay window is also composed of three parts. The difference is that the windows are set up at an angle to each other, creating an alcove or bay. A curved version of this window is called a bow window A large bay with a window adds about 4 feet of extra space to a room where you can situate a chair or a small dining table

A clerestory window is made of a strip of small, horizontal panes set high on a wall. near the ceiling. This window is often used in spaces where you want natural light but need privacy

There are also a variety of small window shapes that are almost strictly decorative. These windows are used independently or in combination with the standard types. An elliptical or arched window is often placed above double-hung or fixed windows., but it can be used alone in situations where a larger unit won’t fit. such as in a dormer or a small bathroom. An oval (or cameo) window and a circular window are used in much h the same way.; both are sometimes located on narrow staircase landings to add light. For a more modern shape, a triangular window or a trapezoidal window is often paired with a large fixed window-a combination known as a cathedral window.